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New Water Sources

June 20, 2014: 

You could make the argument there’s no such thing as “new” water; it’s not something we can create more of. But an area with a growing population in need of more water has various options for increasing its supply of usable or even potable water. Some, such as the trans-mountain diversions of Colorado, have been in use for decades, but are fraught with controversy. Others, like the groundwater replenishment system in Orange Co., Calif., are relatively new and expensive, but promising.

Climate Change and Water Supply

June 20, 2014: 

According to many concerned with future water supply, whether as municipal utility officials or as developers, real estate professionals, and citizens, we need to pay close attention to climate change projections. “Most of the really important impacts of climate change are not going to come directly from temperature increases but because of changes to the water cycle,” says Brad Udall, director of the Western Water Assessment at the University of Colorado and a member of a family known for its political and environmental achievements.

House Committee Approves TRIA Bill

June 20, 2014: 

On Friday, June 20th, the House Financial Services Committee approved Rep. Randy Neugebauer’s (R-TX) TRIA Reauthorization bill, H.R. 4871, by a vote of 32 to 27.

FHA Reverse Mortgage Changes

June 20, 2014: 

On June 18, 2014, the Federal Housing Administration (FHA) released two Mortgagee Letters on the Home Equity Conversion Mortgage (HECM) program.

Water Conservation

June 20, 2014: 

Many who work with water supply issues say if we’re worried about an adequate water supply now or in the future, we should look first to conservation. It’s no different from fixing a leak in your home plumbing. Why would you think about digging another well to supply water to your home if part of your current supply is lost to a leak?

Financing Water Infrastructure

June 19, 2014: 

The United States needs to come up with a lot of money to maintain and repair water infrastructure. The estimated shortfall in funding is $20 billion a year for the next five years, says the American Society of Civil Engineers. States and the federal government are broke, and anti-tax sentiment is high. Is our infrastructure doomed to fail?

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