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Earning the GRI Designation

The GRI designation is a powerful tool to attract and build new business. You'll increase your skill level across the entire landscape of real estate with in-depth training in legal and regulatory issues, technology, professional standards, and the sales process.

Why become a GRI designee

Earning a GRI can make a difference in your business and potentially boost your income. REALTORS® with at least one designation:

  • Earned a median of $61,000 while those without the designation earned a median income of $33,500, a difference of $27,600. (Source: 2013 NAR Member Profile)
  • Reported that they were better able to serve and protect their increasingly sophisticated clients because of their understanding of new technology, laws, and procedures.

How to earn the GRI designation

If you are a member of the NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS® in good standing, you can earn the GRI designation by completing the REALTOR ® Institute program, offered through state REALTOR® associations.

Contact your State Association to get information on program requirements, course schedules, location, and tuition.

Curriculum overview

Each state REALTOR® association sets specific curriculum requirements; these will include courses on issues unique to your state as well as courses on local or national issues that affect you and your clients. A minimum of 60 hours of coursework is required, and subjects covered generally include:

  • Market Knowledge: Neighborhoods and property amenities, considerations for housing types, developing CMAs and impact of MLS, financing options and home-buying programs, inspections and appraisals/valuations
  • Business Skills: Prospecting, buyer and seller services, creating your niche market, negotiations, creating and implementing your brand
  • Systems and Tools: Record retention, form platforms and applications, website portals, marketing tools, hardware and software to streamline your business
  • Avoiding Setbacks, Fines, and Lawsuits: Professional standards, contract to close, risk management, agency relationships, and advertising